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Deep-Fried Turkey Recipe

Deep-Fried Turkey Recipe


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Bradford Thompson's Deep Fried Turkey

You might know James Beard award-winning chef Brad Thompson from the world famous Chef Tailgates he holds just outside of Giants Stadium at every home game. He is also collaborating with Serge Becker to open the eagerly awaited Miss Lily’s on West Houston Street in New York City.

When he is not hosting tailgates, Brad, who is passionate about Jamaican cuisine, makes one of the best hot sauces ever. - Jeff Zalaznick

Ingredients

  • One 14-16 pound turkey, neck and giblets removed
  • 2 quarts Franks Red Hot sauce, plus more if needed
  • Your favorite dry BBQ rub (optional)
  • Frying oil *(see note below)

Tools needed:

  • Syringe
  • Turkey fryer (set up outside)
  • Long-probed, hot-oil thermometer
  • Full propane tank
  • Heavy-weight twine
  • Pole or broomstick
  • Meat thermometer

Directions

The day before cooking, wash the turkey inside and out and pat it dry. Let it sit in the refrigerator overnight to dry out slightly. (You can also submerge the turkey in a brine of 1 gallon water, 1 cup salt, ¾ cup brown sugar and thyme leaves).

The next day, using a syringe, inject the Franks Red Hot sauce into the joints and thick parts of the breasts. Do not worry if the bird has excess sauce on it, this will help the bird color while cooking. You can rub more sauce on the exterior or you can use your favorite dry rub. (I prefer Franks inside and out).

Set up your fryer outside, away from any buildings and anything flammable.

Place the thermometer in the oil to monitor the temperature. Turn the propane on until the oil temperature reaches 375 degrees, about 30 minutes. (When you add the turkey, the oil will dip to about 350 degrees – this is the temperature you want).

Meanwhile, tie the turkey’s legs together with heavy-weight twine and loop the twine around a pole or broomstick. Once the oil is at the desired temperature, with one person holding either side of the pole, slowly lower the turkey, breast-side down, into the fryer, allowing the oil to bubble before lowering completely. This will take about 5 minutes to get the bird fully submerged.

Do not cover the pot while cooking. Occasionally check the temperature of the oil and allow three and a half minutes per pound to cook.

Before removing from the oil, insert a meat thermometer into the leg joints to make sure the internal temperature of the bird has reached 165 degrees. Turn the propane off and remove the bird slowly from the oil. (It is best to wear gloves to protect your hands in case you need to “catch” the bird). Place the turkey on a large board or sheet pan and allow it to rest for 15-20 minutes before carving.


Deep-Fried Turkey Brined in Cayenne and Brown Sugar

Cooking a deep-fried a turkey for Thanksgiving isn't as hard as it sounds (though it does require caution). And there's a great payoff: an exquisitely moist, crispy turkey. You can use different kinds of equipment: a stockpot, an electric fryer, a pot-and-propane setup, or a deep-fryer. The best deep fryers come with a thermostat and a metal basket for lowering the turkey into the hot oil and removing it once it's done. Whatever equipment you use, the procedure is the same: Heat the oil&mdashit can take up to an hour&mdashthen slowly lower the turkey into it. A 12-pound turkey cooks in just 36 minutes following the timing of 3 minutes of frying per pound or turkey. Related: More Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes


COMMENTS

Hi Brianne. The shelf life of LouAna Peanut Oil is 18 months if unopened, 6-9 months once opened. You may&hellip

Hi Brianne. The shelf life of LouAna Peanut Oil is 18 months if unopened, 6-9 months once opened. You may deep-fry with peanut oil, and can usually reuse it 3-4 times. Allow the oil to cool, at least to 150°F, before straining it and pouring it back into the HDPE container. As long as it is properly strained and kept in a dark place, properly stored oil will last for several weeks or possibly more.

Can you filter used oil with a strainer line with coffee filters? How long is it safe to use after?&hellip

Can you filter used oil with a strainer line with coffee filters? How long is it safe to use after? Thank you in advance.

Just curious. I wonder if you inject some peanut oil with other spices and rubbed the outside with the oil if&hellip

Just curious…I wonder if you inject some peanut oil with other spices and rubbed the outside with the oil if that would be just as delicious as a deep-fried turkey? Any thoughts?

Hi Bert. You should deep fry one turkey at a time.

Hi Bert. You should deep fry one turkey at a time.

How many turkeys can be fried in one session?

How many turkeys can be fried in one session?

Hi Joe, we don't have a dry rub recipe, but we hope you find one you like for your turkey!

Hi Joe, we don’t have a dry rub recipe, but we hope you find one you like for your turkey!

I'm looking for the dry rub recipe that is sometimes on the side of the box

I’m looking for the dry rub recipe that is sometimes on the side of the box

Always make sure your fryer or skillet is not overfilled with oil. Most fryers have a recommended fill line. If&hellip

Always make sure your fryer or skillet is not overfilled with oil. Most fryers have a recommended fill line. If there is no fill line, you can determine this by first placing your turkey in the fryer, then fill with water until the bird is covered. Remove the bird and the remaining water level will show you the appropriate fill level for oil. Be sure all the water is removed from the fryer and that the fryer is thoroughly dried before putting the oil in. Be sure the bird is also dry and that no water is in the turkey’s cavity before placing it in the hot oil.**
** “Deep Fat Frying and Food Safety,” USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/deep-fat-frying-and-food-safety/ct_index

Hi Mary, the shelf life of LouAna Peanut Oil is 18 months if unopened, 6-9 months once opened. You may&hellip

Hi Mary, the shelf life of LouAna Peanut Oil is 18 months if unopened, 6-9 months once opened. You may deep-fry with peanut oil, and can usually reuse it 3-4 times. Allow the oil to cool, at least to 150°F, before straining it and pouring it back into the HDPE container. As long as it is properly strained and kept in a dark place, properly stored oil will last for several weeks or possibly more. We recommend sampling the oil and determining if the flavor is suitable for your needs.

How many turkeys can fry with a 3Gallon

How many turkeys can fry with a 3Gallon

mary berarducci on 11.18.18

can oil be used if turkey was cooked last thanksgiving and stored for a year.

can oil be used if turkey was cooked last thanksgiving and stored for a year.


Deep-Fried Turkey

As every politician since Huey Long -- or possibly Madison himself -- has said, ''We can do better.'' And in Louisiana, they have, by doing the unthinkable: deep-frying an entire turkey in a bubbling vat of peanut oil or lard. The result is delicious, surprisingly ungreasy and fast. (A 14-pounder cooks in 49 minutes -- 49 minutes!) I've made five of these things, and comments have ranged from ''This is the best turkey I've ever eaten!'' to ''This is the best turkey I've ever eaten!'' with nary a discouraging word.

Deep-frying must be done outside, which means you will need a propane tank. In New York City it is illegal to cook with propane gas except in large gardens or outdoor spaces of single-family dwellings. It should work fine in a yard, where your fryer can double as a defensive weapon in case of intruders scaling your wall.

In case the oil overflows, place a large bowl and a ladle next to the pot. Also, just before lowering the bird into the oil, and again just before taking it out a scant 49 minutes -- 49 minutes! -- later, turn the flame off for the same reason.


How I Made This Deep Fried Turkey Recipe

  1. I had a turkey thawing in the fridge. So I sat down with the handbook to read every single word, before I dared to test the fryer.
  2. I added the oil and let it preheat.
  3. I dried my turkey thoroughly, even inside the cavity, with paper towels.
  4. I injected the turkey with Butterball Garlic and Herb Turkey Marinade, as the handbook suggested. Then dried it again… Just in case.
  5. I sprinkled it with Butterball Garlic and Herb Seasoning and placed it in the frying basket.
  6. Then ever so slowly, holding my breath, I lowered the turkey into the hot oil.
  7. I closed the lid and set the timer for 50 minutes, 3-4 minutes per lb.

Then waited anxiously for something bad to happen. But guess what… it didn’t! The turkey came out of the fryer crispy on the outside, ultra moist on the inside, just like I hoped.


Strawberry & Cream Croissant French Toast For Your Weekend Brunch

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Deep-Fried Turkey

Cooks Note: To measure the amount of oil needed to fry the turkey, place turkey in fryer, add water to top of turkey, remove the turkey and the water line will indicate how much oil will be needed to fry your turkey. Having too much oil can cause a fire. The pot should not be more than 3/4 full or the oil could overflow when the turkey is added.

Wash bird inside and out, and allow to drain. Rub turkey all over with House Seasoning. Coat turkey with dry rub. Allow the bird to sit until it reaches room temperature.

Heat peanut oil in a turkey fryer or a very, very large stockpot to 350 °F. Lower turkey into hot oil, very carefully, making sure it is fully submerged. Fry turkey for 3 minutes per pound plus 5 minutes per bird. Remove turkey from oil and drain on paper towels.

Safety tips:

The turkey fryer needs to be outside on a flat surface. Do not deep fry a turkey in a garage or a covered carport.

Always keep a fire extinguisher (rated for grease fires) nearby.

Large oven mitts or fireplace gloves must be worn.

Always wear eye protection and full face protection would be even better.

When lowering the turkey into the oil, turn off the flame.

And do not allow those guests, especially children and pets near the turkey cooker.

Follow these safety tips and use common sense and your turkey frying experience will be safe and successful.


  • 1 turkey, about 12 pounds (5.5kg), giblets removed, patted dry
  • 2 to 4 gallons (7.8 to 15L) peanut oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

If Using an Outdoor Frying Rig: Place turkey on frying rig according to manufacturer's instructions, with legs pointing down. Add to empty frying vessel. Add water, measuring as you go, until turkey is barely submerged. Remove turkey and dry well with paper towels. Discard water and dry frying pot well, then fill with equivalent amount of oil.

Ignite turkey fryer and heat oil to 350°F (177°C). Turn off gas completely and slowly lower turkey into hot oil (process should take at least 1 1/2 minutes). When turkey is fully submerged, reignite turkey fryer and adjust flame to maintain steady 325 to 350°F (163 to 177°C). Fry until an instant-read thermometer inserted into coolest part of breast registers 145°F (63°C), about 25 minutes. Allow excess oil to drip back into pot, transfer turkey to a clean disposable aluminum tray or rimmed baking sheet, season with salt and pepper, and allow to rest at least 10 minutes before carving and serving.

If Using an Indoor Turkey Fryer: Add oil to fryer, being sure not to surpass maximum fill line. Set fryer to 350°F (177°C) and preheat oil. When oil is heated, follow manufacturer's instructions for frying turkey. Monitor oil temperature during frying. If it drops and stays below 300°F (150°C), remove turkey and allow oil to come back up to 350°F before continuing. Fry until an instant-read thermometer inserted into coolest part of breast registers 145°F, about 25 minutes. Season turkey with salt and pepper and allow to rest for at least 10 minutes before carving and serving.


How to Deep-Fry a Turkey

Frying turkey does come with a few cautions, but if you follow directions you will have no problems! We have fried turkey for several years in a row now, and have a few pro tips.

1. Follow directions. (wait, did I already say that?)
3. INJECT and RUB that baby!

We have tried only injecting, the next year we tried only marinating the turkey in a rub but year 3 was our magical year. That year we RUBBED and INJECTED and we can honestly say this is the only way to do it.


Cajun Deep Fried Turkey

  • Yield : 1
  • Servings : 8-10
  • Prep Time : 45m
  • Cook Time : 45m
  • Ready In : 1:30 h
  • Add to Recipe Box

One of my favorite cooking ideas is to deep fat fry our turkey for the holidays or New Year’s parties. My wife loves it when I cook gives her time to do the other baking and cooking while I prepare the main dish.

Ingredients

  • 12-15 lbs turkey
  • 1 1/2 cups Italian dressing
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1 handful Cajun seasonings
  • Peanut oil, amount depending on size of turkey
  • Garlic powder and onion powder to taste

Directions

Step 1

Two days prior to cooking: Defrost turkey. Although not recommended by the FDA, when I have forgotten to take it out early enough, I have successfully thawed it in warm water in the sink - draining and refilling as water turns cool.

Step 2

Evening prior: Strain Italian dressing to catch items too big for the injector needle. Melt a stick of butter and add to the strained dressing.

Step 3

Take a handful of your favorite Cajun seasonings and add to marinade (I prefer Tony Chachere's (TM) Creole seasoning, Chef Paul Prudhomme's® blackened seasoning, Zatarins® Creole seasoning, Cajun Shake seasonings, and any Cajun spice I can get my hands on).

Step 4

Add onion powder and garlic powder to taste. You can also purchase Cajun Injector seasoning from the store.

Step 5

Use injector to inject marinade into the breasts, thighs, and wings. Stick the needle all the way in. As you slowly pull out, slowly press and inject spices into the turkey. Inject from multiple angles for maximum coverage. The more you use, the juicier the turkey will be when you cook it. Also, rub seasoning on the outside of the turkey, under the skin, and the inside cavity as well.

Step 6

Place turkey, legs up, on holder and place inside plastic oven roasting bag. Keep overnight in an ice chest with a little ice.

Step 7

Morning of: Fill fryer approximately 1/3 with oil (You don't need peanut oil, but once you try it, you won't use anything else. It also smokes less).

Step 8

Dip turkey while in the plastic bag in oil and fill or drain as needed. Oil should just cover the top of turkey. Ensure you have a hole at the top of the plastic bag, otherwise the bag will expand with air and you will not get an accurate reading. Take turkey out of oil and place back in cooler.

Step 9

Heat oil to 375°-400°F. It takes approximately 30 minutes. Remove turkey from plastic wrap and place in oil. Oil should drop to 350°. Ensure you keep the temperature between 325°-350°F, but the closer to 350°F the better. Cook 2-3 minutes per pound. Never, ever cover pot with lid! You will have much more on your hands than a "smokin' Cajun turkey."

Step 10

Remove and let the turkey rest before carving. According to Emeril, the best way to carve is to pull the legs, wings and thighs off then undercut the breast following the bone to the center and then slice.