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Cretons (French Canadian meat spread) recipe

Cretons (French Canadian meat spread) recipe



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This is my mum's recipe for cretons, a pork spread which is served (cold) on warm toast for breakfast. A French Canadian classic!

5 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 450g minced pork
  • 1 onion, grated
  • 60ml water
  • 120ml chicken stock
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves or allspice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 or 2 tablespoons milk

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:1hr30min ›Ready in:1hr40min

  1. Place minced pork, grated onion, water, chicken stock, ground cloves, salt and pepper in a saucepan. Simmer over medium-low heat for 90 minutes, stirring frequently. After 45 minutes, add milk and continue to cook, adding more milk if needed during cooking so it doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan. Mash while stirring, or mash to desired consistency after cooking. Chill overnight before serving.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(4)


Creton: Wake up to a French-Canadian tradition

Creton (pronounced crUH-ton) was the breakfast of choice for the French settlers of Canada. Growing up as I did in the Quebec countryside near Montreal, reminders of pioneer life were easily found close to home. The land outside our door was vast and its history, rich. The traditional creton recipe is a blend of pork and exotic spices, congealed and then spread on toast. In a harsh winter climate it made perfect sense to eat such a breakfast before heading into the forest on snowshoes. Today it makes sense because it tastes so gourmet good.

Though the traditional creton recipe is upheld to this day, some now serve it more discerningly as a snack or appetizer (also substituting leaner meats). Still, this medley of simple farmhouse ingredients is elevated by the addition of a few unexpected aromatic seasonings. The result is a surprising, subtle, sublime savoury sensation. It’s a recipe that requires slow cooking with constant stirring, something the Thermomix does so very well. For me creton is synonymous with a childhood in Canada’s French province. My mother’s kitchen always smelled warmly of tradition, family, hard work, and joie de vivre. On the best of days, our house was infused with the spicy aroma of simmering creton. Bon appétit tout le monde!


Pork “Creton” (Meat Spread)

I also added the bread crumbs at the end of the hour this way the meat gets thoroughly cooked because it is pork. Then another 10 minutes for the breadcrumbs to be soaked up. Stirring often. Letting it set, put into small containers, cool, refrigerate. Yum. Have fun.

Maureen B.

Hi, for the spices I used a pinch of ground Allspice, pinch of ground Cloves, 2 t chopped Garlic. The aroma was" something smells good". The little t in the recipe is meant for teaspoon. A big T = Tablespoon. I am having fun with eating all of it by myself on crackers using a knife to spread. Good luck

Candy U.

What are the spices in this spice blend?

Guillaume t.

Lucie J.

Thanks skyena D. is used Chinese 5 spices blend and the cretons are now resting in my septic tank.

Skyena d.

I didn't bother sweating the onions and garlic. I just put it all into a pot to simmer. I used 2 cups of soft breadcrumbs instead of dry, and I soaked them in the milk before adding it to the pork. I also used regular pork, so added just a tbsp of butter. For the spice blend, I used 1/2 tsp each of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. You could always adjust these to your liking.


Creton Québecois

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Cretons are a pork spread that is a staple in Quebec and not much heard about in the rest of Canada. I’ve heard it called “gorton” or “corton” among French- New Englanders. It is close to French rillettes in recipe. But much closer to pate in spirit.

Cretons are served on bread or toast most often as a part of breakfast. But it’s also popular as a snack in rural Quebec.

Instructions

  1. 1 Phase 1
    1) Remove the membrane from the fat and cut it into small pieces.
    2) Melt it over medium heat, being careful to stir so that it does not stick. It is cooked once the fat no longer gives off any water and the remaining bits of meat are golden brown.
    3) Pour through a fine strainer and chop the remaining bits of meat with a knife. Keep the fat for frying potatoes or cubes of meat.
  1. 1 Phase 2

1) Put the pork through a meat grinder. Cook it with the chopped onion and water. Stir constantly at the beginning.
2) After 30 minutes, add the remaining bits of meat from the rendered fat, the salt, pepper and spices. Let simmer for 15 to 20 minutes over low heat.
3) Pack the meat into moulds. Add a little of the rendered fat as desired.
4) Let cool before serving.


Cretons de Quebec Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound ground pork (try it with ground turkey if you’d prefer!)
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 medium onion – finely diced
  • 1 clove garlic – minced
  • 1 pinch ground cinnamon
  • 1 pinch ground cloves
  • 1 pinch ground allspice
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup bread crumbs (depending on how thick you want the mixture to be)

Instructions:

Cook the meat in a large skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Drain off the fat.

Add the onion, garlic, and spices and cook until onions have softened slightly. Add the milk and bread crumbs and continue to simmer over low heat for 2 hours.

Be sure to stir occasionally until the milk mostly evaporates and the mixture starts to thicken.

Remove from the heat and taste. Adjust seasoning as desired.

This is served cool or even cold from the fridge (which is where it should be stored). Refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight before serving to allow it to firm up.


Cretons

In the old days when killing a fattened pig in the autumn was a way of life in French Canada, making cretons was one delicious way of preserving meat for the winter. For this reason, meat with a generous layer of fat helped in the conservation of this homemade pork spread. Today, leaner meat can be used, but should still have some fat so that the cretons spreads easily on hot bread.


Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread)

The following are the ingredients needed to make delicious Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread) for 40 servings:

  • 2 pounds finely ground pork fat
  • 2 pounds finely ground pork
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread) Cooking Instructions

To cook Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread), you need about 15 minutes of preparation time. The time needed to cook this Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread) is about 1 hour 45 minutes , and you can serve your Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread) within 14 hours . The following are the steps to cook Gorton (French-Canadian Pork Spread) easily:

  1. 1 Stir the pork fat, ground pork, onions, water, cloves, and nutmeg together in a large pot. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until the pork is tender, at least 1 1/2 hours. Use a potato masher to mash the pork mixture every 15 minutes as it cooks.
  2. 2 The longer you simmer the gorton, the better the flavor will be. Add water as needed to keep the mixture from boiling dry. When you're ready to stop cooking, let the liquid reduce as much as possible without letting it burn. Refrigerate the gorton overnight. Remove and discard the fat layer, or stir it into the meat for a creamier spread.

Notes

  • Partner Tip
  • Reynolds® Aluminum foil can be used to keep food moist, cook it evenly, and make clean-up easier.

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving: 236 calories 23.4 grams of fat 1.1 gram of carbohydrates 4.8 grams of protein 28 milligrams of cholesterol 15 milligrams of sodium.

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Heart attack on toast lol But I love this. My french candiadian mil who lived in manchester nh called it Gutons and the local little markets sold it as the same name. May have the spelling w .

This was also a Christmas recipe my Grammy used to make. Here kids would fight over who got to take the leftovers home. I make it in a crockpot with a bone in boston butt. Yellow onions, sal .

- The art of making Cretons has been handed-down in my family for 6 generations (french canadian), and I continue to be amazed at all the recipe variations and names for this spreadable deli .

A very dear friend and "second Mom" introduced this wonderful spread to me 45 years ago. She has long since passed and she was heavy on my mind a couple weeks ago and the "cahhton" came to m .

My mom made this when I was growing up in Maine. She died when I was 22 (I'm 65 now) and had never written her recipes down. I just discovered this recipe yesterday watching an episode of .

Yes in New England we call it gorton. My pepere was French Canadian and my memere made this every Christmas in large batches, put them into tupperware containers and gave them away as gifts. .

My mom always made this for us growing up as kids, over the years she stopped doing it. I made it this evening and my husband can't wait to try it tommorrow. She always called it cretons(pro .

It may be "creton" in some areas, but our 83 year old french canadian grandmother has always called it "gorton" ( cahh-ton. and she adds an s at the end)

Just so you are aware, its "Creton" but the recipe looks good. :)

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This is a very basic recipe, and if I were craving cretons and didn't have any availiable at the grocery's, I would make this one as a last resort, but I have a very similar recipe that uses evaporated milk instead of regular milk, unflavoured gelatin, and a lot less garlic. I use granulated garlic sparingly (about a teaspoon) instead of a real clove, because it's just too fragrant. I also find that using a half-porc, half-veal mixture for the meat makes it much more spreadable. I'll use lean veal and extra lean porc. After you are done cooking it, place it in the food processor for a few spins. About half of the creton varieties you will find at the grocery's have been food-processed. I enjoy them either way. Great on toast, baguette, but a really scrumptious treat is having it on a freshly baked croissant. Mmmm.

This is not a spread. You absolutely should not cook this on medium for an hour. My pan burned because of course all of the liquid evaporated out of it and the end result is ground meat not a spread. The taste was good and I made a sandwich out of it, but I would not make this again.

Great basic recipe ! I am from Quebec and this is very similar to an old family recipe. Please do not try to get a "spread" smooth as creamy peanut butter (this is the stuff you find in grocery stores out of Quebec and not the real texture. ). You do not need to put the cooked mixture in a food processor at the end. it just takes the spirit out of it. . It should have some "grains" and the fat will make it stick together when you spread it. Make sure you do not use lean pork and you do not need to put butter or oil in it when you start. Let is simmer for an hour in a covered pot and stir from time to time. Good luck !

This recipe works well and tastes great warm but at refridge' temps is a little flat. Bumping up the seasoning would help. This and virtually all foods prepared hot but served cold, should taste a bit salty and over-spiced to have the desired result when cold. Now can anyone who grew up on Cretons tell me what the consistency of the final product should be? My first attempt is about as spreadable as cold Peanut Butter. Thanks. JJ

I made this recipe for my husband, he is originally from Montreal, Canada, and Creton is one thing he misses terribly, he loved it. Great recipe.

This recipe is a very old one. As with ones that are passed down from Mere Mere, pronouced "meh-may". (grandmother). These recipes vary greatly. From Cretons with spices to ones that have hardly any. I tend to like the spices, and the oldest recipe I have found includes these wonderful spices. This recipe was made for me over 20 years ago from a friend that we were stationed with in the Air Force. She was very "French Canadian" and spoke it often. Once having this recipe, I was hooked with French Canadian Cuisine. This recipe was left a little bland for me. Many have had a hard time with this one. But you must be patient with this one. It takes a long time to cook. And even if the liquid looks all gone, keep stirring and at the end when all of it is still hot, turn it in a food processor. Just to get that perfect Puree. Press it in a loaf pan. Then you can turn it out and make slices to match the size of the bread. This is a fantastic breakfast. As they say: Çé tsiguidou. (everythings A-Okay, or everythings alright)


Recipe Cretons: French Canadian Pork Spread

It's that time of year again..this pork spread is something like pate' but quite simple to make..It is traditionally eaten on toast for breakfast, but we've come to add it to the appetizer table at family functions..I usually make it and send family home with some otherwise I'll eat it all..

1 lb ground pork
1 cup milk
1 small onion diced
2-3 garlic cloves minced
salt and pepper
pinch of ground cloves
pinch of ground allspice
1/4 cup bread crumbs

Soften onion and garlic with a bit of oil for 5 minutes. Add pork, brown and break it up..add milk and spices, then some salt and pepper to taste once it is cooked enough to sample..put lid on pot and simmer for an hour. Turn off heat, add bread crumbs, stir in well, then check your salt and pepper again..let cool and add to ramekins or bowls..chill overnight, at least. Spread it on your favorite cracker or bread with a side of mustard and some pickles..it freezes well also..


French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread

The following are the ingredients needed to make delicious French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread for 16 servings:

  • 1 pound lean pork butt, cut into pieces
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • salt and black pepper to taste

French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread Cooking Instructions

To cook French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread, you need about 5 minutes of preparation time. The time needed to cook this French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread is about 1 hour 10 minutes , and you can serve your French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread within 5 hours 15 minutes . The following are the steps to cook French-Canadian Gorton Pork Spread easily:

  1. 1 Place the pork, onion, cinnamon, and clove into a saucepan. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour in water to just cover the meat. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and cook until the water has nearly evaporated, about 1 hour. Stir occasionally to ensure the pork cooks evenly.
  2. 2 Use a potato masher or wire whisk to break the pork into thin strands. Pour off any remaining liquid, then spoon the gorton into a serving bowl. Refrigerate until cold before serving.

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving: 59 calories 3.5 grams of fat 1.4 gram of carbohydrates 5.1 grams of protein 18 milligrams of cholesterol 18 milligrams of sodium.

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Just the way my mom made it. Only, don't use mustard, use ketchup.

just something missing. not enough tang to the taste. doesn't spread smoothly as it should. crumbles and falls apart. not easy to spread but the batter came out as smooth as can be. family u .

In Quebec cuisine, cretons (sometimes gorton or corton, especially among New Englanders of Quebec origin) is a pork spread containing onions and spices. Due to its fatty texture and taste, i .

Thank you! My grandmother made this each Christmas Eve. We would tease each other that the only 'real' French-Canadiens in the family would eat it. Delicious on white bread fresh from the ba .

I made this for a potluck and flavors are so much more complex than the recipe implies. People scarfed it down and it was one of the first dishes to be cleaned out. One thing that I would .

We collect all the best recipes spread on the internet into a place. And we present it to you cuisine lovers. You don't need to travel the world to try a variety of world-class cuisines, find your favorite recipes easily here. With details of cooking ingredients and complete cooking instructions will make your cooking event easier and happier.

All content contained in this site summarized from various third parties, and we do not guarantee the validity or authenticity of its contents. All existing recipes are property of their respective owners, and we do not claim that in any way. If you find any content that should not be here please contact us immediately.

All recipes are subject to RedCipes's Terms of Use. We allow users to flag recipes that may be in violation of those terms. Recipes may also be flagged by RedCipes. However, no moderation system is perfect, and flagging a recipe does not ensure that it will be removed.


Watch the video: Cretons - French Canadian recipe (August 2022).