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Carpe Donut: Next Level Gourmet Snacks

Carpe Donut: Next Level Gourmet Snacks



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The Carpe Donut truck was parked outside our offices the other day and we couldn’t resist going down and seeing what it was about. We ordered an apple cider donut and as we had hoped, it was incredible! It was cakey (in the best sense), but not too dense or too sweet.

The award-winning donut was so good in fact, that we followed up with truck owner Andrew Bozzo to discuss donuts, their Grub Street Award, and the future of Carpe Donuts.

Carpe Donuts comes after an increasing trend in donuts, but Bozzo thinks it’s more than that. “Donuts are a part of the bigger trend of gourmet versions of comfort food. It’s taking something that has lowly status and reimagining it in a fancier, more thought out, less mass-produced way.”

And these gourmet donuts are creating some buzz; with a New York Magazine naming their Apple Cider Donut one of the best in 2013 and a Vendy nomination for best dessert truck, it appears as though Bozzo and his team at Carpe Donuts have mastered the fried art, or are at least well on their way.

It would come as no surprise that Bozzo’s favorite donut is the Apple Cider donut, too, which he tells us is a cake donut as opposed to a yeast donut. “Most cake donuts are very dense, but the donut we make is a bit lighter than the traditional cake donut.”

Carpe Donuts is part of the preeminent impact that food trucks have made on the New York culinary scene, with owners like Bozzo seeing it as an opportunity to reach more customers.

“In a traditional shop, unless you have good presence on a city-wide level from a review or are in with the right group, you can’t break out of that cycle. [With a truck, you] can bring yourself to the neighborhoods you want to be in and grow your audience that way. We bring our whole presence everywhere we go.”

When we asked him about the future of Carpe Donuts, Bozzo responded with hesitant optimism. “We’re still young and we’re happy to have all of the great responses from our customers,” he said. “Could I see a brick-and-mortar location? Yes definitely. More trucks? Yes definitely. We’re still in the beginning stages, though, so we’re going to focus on making sure everything is working as best as we can.”


Taking the Donut to the Next Level: Dawn’s New Gourmet Donut Program

For nearly 100 years, Dawn Foods has been focused on bringing customers the insights, innovations and strategies necessary to help grow their business and meet the needs of consumers. More now than ever, bakers need new, exciting offerings to break through in a crowded environment. Yet at the same time, bakers need ideas that can push their business forward, without taking more time or resources.

Enter the gourmet donut. According to research from Datassential, 65 percent of consumers are likely to try a gourmet donut– donuts that mix flavors, textures and an unexpected combination. The kicker? Gourmet donuts can be sold as high as $5.00 per donut, with 73 percent of consumers saying they will pay $2.99 for a donut. Despite this, only 9 percent of operators plan to add them to their menus due to the perceived time investment and ingredients needed.

To combat these concerns, Dawn has created a turnkey gourmet donut program to help bakers drive revenue and profit growth while introducing new donut options consumers love. Through our 12 new gourmet donuts, we make it easy for our customers to capitalize on the gourmet donut trend with the insights, ingredients and ready-to-make recipes to keep bakery customers coming back for more – all while bringing in nearly double the profit per donut. The added labor of this program is minimal, and the donuts only require a few extra ingredients, making them easy to integrate into the daily bakery mix.


Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Sewing misadventures

I'm working on an apron from my sewing class. I have to get the ruffle attached and spaced properly, and then I can sew it. The problem is, it all looks even when I start but then I end up with lots of ruffle in some places and none in the other.

I got another apron sewing pattern to try on my own. This one looks relatively simple. I figure for confidence's sake, it may be good for me.

There are a bunch of thing I'd like to make. But I have to get this done.

Other than the sewing frustration, I read. I had a weird moment where I realized the book--written by an author I love--was falling flat for me.


Coquette (Raleigh, NC)

After several years, I finally got a chance to try Coquette, the French restaurant in Raleigh’s North Hills. Perhaps the main draw of this place is the atmosphere – it’s lovely. Coquette deliberately intends to recreate that quintessential French brasserie, and comes damn close with the look and feel – black and white flooring, marble surfaces, cafe tables and chairs, nice lighting, etc. It’s elegant and refined, and, even if it’s little vast to feel entirely cozy, it’s a beautiful place to come eat. The only place I know in the Triangle that’s even more wonderfully French is Durham’s Vin Rouge.

Unfortunately, the food I tried did not live up to the setting. We went for a late lunch one day, and I was hungry. The menu runs the gamut of French standards – steak frites, moules frites, quiches, crepes, soups, you name it. There are a handful of sandwiches as well, including a $10-$12 hamburger. I started with the gruyere and potato croquettes ($5). These arrived as 2 or 3 oblong balls in a cute tiny pewter-looking chalise. They suffered principally from a very thick fried coating similar to what you’d expect on a cheap frozen fried mozzeralla stick, and were a little overcooked. My wife thought the accompanying garlic aioli tasted like straight up butter. We didn’t finish them. I moved on to a “frisee aux lardons” salad (curly endive, brioche croutons, cider grain mustard vinaigrette, $7). No complaints there. Finally I had the “Parisian Gnocchi” (chicken confit, butternut squash, dried cranberries, spinach, $8.5). This was listed as under “les petits plats” (small dishes), and it wasn’t huge, but, with a salad, was definitely enough for a full meal. The problem was it just wasn’t very good. The gnocchi were a bit dense, but, more than that, it was a rather unappealing, uninspired combination. My wife ordered a croque madame ($8.5), which featured a very runny egg, and came with a huge mountain of slim french fries. She was happy enough with her meal. I tried the fries, and they were ok.

Would I return to Coquette? Yes, for the atmosphere, professional service, and the hopes of a good brunch perhaps. And you feel like you’re in France. But for outstanding French food, I’d probably head elsewhere. My top choice in the area would be Durham’s Rue Cler.


Top 15 Food Trucks In Virginia

Each day, Red Hook Lobster Pound, DC serves up lunch to hundreds of Washingtonians — providing a taste of Maine that everyone enjoys.

2. Gelati Celesti, RVA

Remember when ice cream trucks had more than just Popsicles? Gelati Celesti has real homemade ice cream in flavors that go beyond the big three (chocolate, vanilla, strawberry). They also make their own cones.

3. Strite’s Donuts, Harrisonburg

Anyone who has tried one of Strite’s donuts fresh out of the oil will still remember that soft, warm morsel, dripping with goodness and flavor! And even the most self-disciplined person will be back for seconds.

4. Bruno’s GastroTruck, CVille

The GastroTruck is a fully loaded kitchen on wheels. Bruno is able to give you that same restaurant quality food, only faster and on the streets. The menu will change at least weekly if not daily based on what crazy things he comes up with next.

5. DC Slices, DC

DC’s first mobile pizza kitchen! Baking up fun and Thin Crust pizza on the go.

6. Twisted Sisters Cupcakes & Sugar Shack Cafe, VA Beach

Twisted Sisters is a great gourmet cupcake truck with a changing weekly menu. They have creative flavors like “Harry Potter Butter Beer” and pudding filled cakes as well.

7. The Bakers Dozen Donuts, Harrisonburg

If fresh HOMEMADE, made from scratch donuts and baked goods are your thing, The Bakers Dozen Donuts has you covered!

8. Goatacado, RVA

For any health nuts out there, Goatacado is perfect. They focus on healthy and fresh food, and a strong commitment to the environment.

9. Carpe Donut, CVille

Once upon a time, two donut-loving fools decided that the people of Charlottesville, Va. needed a source for hot fresh donuts made from scratch with fresh organic ingredients. Carpe Donut was born.

10. Ta Korean, DC

Delicious Korean BBQ Tacos for Washington, DC on the go!

11. Bro’s Fish Tacos, Va Beach

This husband and wife team serves California style beer battered fish tacos and grilled chipotle lime seasoned cod! Not only that, all there produce is organic, and their fish is wild caught.

12. King of Pops, RVA

There’s nothing better than a cold Popsicle on a hot day, but what about all natural, hand crafted Popsicles with fresh fruit? With seasonal flavors like pumpkin spice latte, King of Pops can’t be beat!

13. Cap Mac, DC

CapMac was opened in November of 2010, and the truck has skyrocketed to local fame and earned numerous accolades on a national level.

14. Grilled Cheese Mania, Harrisonburg

These homemade sandwiches are simply delicious! They always use fresh vegetables, cheeses, meats and breads to make the perfect grilled cheese for you. All of their soups, sides, sauces and drinks are made using their own family recipes.

15. The Big Cheese, DC

The Big Cheese is a gourmet grilled cheese food truck in the DC area providing affordable gourmet grilled cheeses for parents and children alike.

At Scoutology, we scout your city so you don’t have to. You’re going to love the Scoutology Network.


Carbohydrate reduced menus feature protein sources, plenty of vegetables, and other unprocessed, healthy foods. Basically, a balanced menu includes products such as: non-gluten grains, healthy oils and fats, dairies, seeds and nuts, eggs, fish, lean meat, some vegetables, some fruits

There are plenty of healthy and filling breakfast ideas for your menu, for example:

  • chickpea pancakes
  • deviled or scrambled eggs
  • baked eggs with spinach
  • almond meal pancakes
  • pecan and pumpkin pancakes
  • spinach omelet rolls
  • bacon and eggs

Dieters use flour substitutes such as soy flour, almond flour, coconut flour, protein powder, and pumpkin puree.


Foods To Eat And Drink While Watching Hockey

1. Walk Away Steak with Chili Beer Dip

Grilling steak is an awesome pre-game ritual. During the hockey game, these BBQ steak skewers &ndash paired with a mouthwatering spicy dip that incorporates applesauce &ndash make handy, satisfying snacks, whether you&rsquore chilling in your recliner or up and cheering. Want to mix up this hockey food recipe? Honour the city that&rsquos won the most pro titles with Montreal Steak Marinade.

Try these skewer recipes as well:

2. Ultimate Canadian Poutine

Poutine &ndash French fries with cheese curds and gravy &ndash is such a taste treat that when St. Louis won its first title, Canadian team members ate it out of the championship trophy. Our poutine recipe elevates this shareable favourite with crumbled bacon and Montreal Steak Spice Seasoning.

3. Spicy Japanese Izakaya Style Grilled Wings

Whether or not you cheer for a team whose logo features wings, you&rsquoll love these easy-to-grab, grilled chicken wings, best-enjoyed with Homemade Wasabi Furikake Seasoning.

More wings recipes to try:

4. Classic French&rsquos Hot Dog

Arguably the greatest hockey player of all time once confessed he liked to eat hot dogs before every game. You can elevate your game too with these delicious hot dogs, featuring French&rsquos mustard and ketchup and shredded cabbage.

While you're cooking your hot dogs, grab some more ingredients to make these as well:

5. Ginger Teriyaki Turkey Burgers

There&rsquos no elite pro hockey team in Hawaii (yet!), but the pineapple garnish on this delectable teriyaki turkey burger can put you in a sunny mood from puck drop to the final buzzer.

Fire up the grill and give these hockey game day burger recipes a try:

6. Buffalo Cauliflower Bites

Over the years, Buffalo has hosted some of the world's best hockey players, and you can live your best life with these signature Buffalo Cauliflower Bites. Try them with Southwest Lime and Yogurt Dipping Sauce.

Got a lot of cauliflower? Make these recipes to enjoy an even bigger spread:


Contents

Chestnuts belong to the family Fagaceae, which also includes oaks and beeches. The four main species groups are commonly known as American, [4] European, Chinese, and Japanese chestnuts.

Subfamily Image Scientific name CommonName Distribution
American chestnuts Castanea dentata American chestnut eastern states
Castanea pumila American or Allegheny chinkapin, also known as "dwarf chestnut" southern and eastern states [5] [6]
Asian chestnuts Castanea mollissima Chinese chestnut China
Castanea henryi Chinese chinkapin, also called Henry's chestnut China
Castanea seguinii Seguin's chestnut China
Castanea crenata Japanese chestnut, Korean chestnut Malaysia and perhaps other Southeast Asian countries
European chestnut Castanea sativa sweet chestnut also called "Spanish chestnut" in the US and the UK China, introduced to the Himalayas and other temperate parts of Asia.

The unrelated horse chestnuts (genus Aesculus) are not true chestnuts but are named for producing nuts of similar appearance that are mildly poisonous to humans. They should not be confused with water chestnuts, which are tubers of an aquatic herbaceous plant in the sedge family Cyperaceae. [7] [8] Other species commonly mistaken for chestnut trees are the chestnut oak (Quercus prinus) and the American beech (Fagus grandifolia), [9] [10] both of which are also in the Fagaceae.

The name "chestnut" is derived from an earlier English term "chesten nut", which descends from the Old French word chastain (Modern French, châtaigne). [11] The French word in turn derives from Latin Castanea (also the scientific name of the tree), which traces to the Ancient Greek word κάστανον (sweet chestnut). [12] A possible source of the Greek word is the ancient town of Kastanea in Thessaly. [5] The town probably took its name, though, from the trees growing around it. [13] In the Mediterranean climate zone, chestnut trees are rarer in Greece because the chalky soil is not conducive to the tree's growth. Kastania is located on one of the relatively few sedimentary or siliceous outcrops. They grow so abundantly there that their presence would have determined the place's name. [14] Still others take the name as coming from the Greek name of Sardis glans (Sardis acorn) – Sardis being the capital of Lydia, Asia Minor, from where the fruit had spread. [15]

The name is cited twice in the King James Version of the Bible. In one instance, Jacob puts peeled twigs in the water troughs to promote healthy offspring of his livestock. [16] Although it may indicate another tree, it indicates the fruit was a local staple food in the early 17th century. [13]

These synonyms are or have been in use: Fagus Castanea (used by Linnaeus in first edition of Species Plantarum, 1753), [17] Sardian nut, Jupiter's nut, husked nut, and Spanish chestnut (U.S.). [18]

Chestnut trees are of moderate growth rate (for the Chinese chestnut tree) to fast-growing for American and European species. [18] Their mature heights vary from the smallest species of chinkapins, often shrubby, [19] to the giant of past American forests, C. dentata that could reach 60 m . Between these extremes are found the Japanese chestnut (C. crenata) at 10 m average [note 1] followed by the Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima) at about 15 m , then the European chestnut (C. sativa) around 30 m . [10]

The Chinese and more so the Japanese chestnuts are both often multileadered and wide-spreading, [10] whereas European and especially American species tend to grow very erect when planted among others, with little tapering of their columnar trunks, which are firmly set and massive. When standing on their own, they spread on the sides and develop broad, rounded, dense crowns at maturity. [18] The latter two's foliage has striking yellow autumn coloring. [21]

Its bark is smooth when young, [22] of a vinous maroon or red-brown color for the American chestnut, [13] grey for the European chestnut. With age, American species' bark becomes grey and darker, thick, and deeply furrowed the furrows run longitudinally, and tend to twist around the trunk as the tree ages it sometimes reminds one of a large cable with twisted strands. [18]

The leaves are simple, ovate or lanceolate, 10–30 cm long and 4–10 cm wide, with sharply pointed, widely spaced teeth, with shallow rounded sinuates between. [7]

The flowers follow the leaves, appearing in late spring or early summer [18] or into July. [19] They are arranged in long catkins of two kinds, [19] with both kinds being borne on every tree. [13] Some catkins are made of only male flowers, which mature first. Each flower has eight stamens, or 10 to 12 for C. mollissima. [23] The ripe pollen carries a heavy, sweet odor [19] that some people find too sweet or unpleasant. Other catkins have these pollen-bearing flowers, but also carry near the twig from which these spring, small clusters of female or fruit-producing flowers. Two or three flowers together form a four-lobed prickly calybium, which ultimately grows completely together to make the brown hull, or husk, covering the fruits. [18]

Chestnut flowers are not self-compatible, so two trees are required for pollination. All Castanea species readily hybridize with each other.

The fruit is contained in a spiny (very sharp) cupule 5–11 cm in diameter, also called "bur" or "burr". [24] The burrs are often paired or clustered on the branch [19] and contain one to seven nuts according to the different species, varieties, and cultivars. [1] [2] [25] [26] Around the time the fruits reach maturity, the burrs turn yellow-brown and split open in two or four sections. They can remain on the tree longer than they hold the fruit, but more often achieve complete opening and release the fruits only after having fallen on the ground opening is partly due to soil humidity. [6]

The chestnut fruit has a pointed end with a small tuft at its tip (called "flame" in Italian [6] ), and at the other end, a hilum – a pale brown attachment scar. In many varieties, the fruit is flattened on one or two sides. It has two skins. The first one is a hard, shiny, brown outer hull or husk, called the pericarpus [27] the industry calls this the "peel". [6] Underneath the pericarpus is another, thinner skin, called the pellicle or episperm. [27] The pellicle closely adheres to the seed itself, following the grooves usually present at the surface of the fruit. These grooves are of variable sizes and depths according to the species and variety.

The fruit inside these shows two cotyledons with a creamy-white flesh throughout, [8] except in some varieties which show only one cotyledon, and whose episperm is only slightly or not intruded at all. Usually, these varieties have only one large fruit per burr, well rounded (no flat face) and which is called "marron" [6] (marron de Lyon in France, marron di Mugello in Italy, or paragon).

Chestnut fruit has no epigeal dormancy and germinate right upon falling to the ground in the autumn, with the roots emerging from the seed right away and the leaves and stem the following spring. Because the seeds lack a coating or internal food supply, they lose viability soon after ripening and must be planted immediately.

The superior fruiting varieties among European chestnuts have good size, sweet taste, and easy-to-remove inner skins. [28] [29] American chestnuts are usually very small (around 5 g ), but sweet-tasting with easy-to-remove pellicles. Some Japanese varieties have very large nuts (around 40 g ), with typically difficult-to-remove pellicles. Chinese chestnut pellicles are usually easy to remove, and their sizes vary greatly according to the varieties, although usually smaller than the Japanese chestnut. [10]

Europe Edit

Top chestnut producing countries by years
(in metric tons)
Rank Country 1979 2009 2010 2011 2016 2017 2018 2019
1 China 123,000 1,550,000 1,620,000 1,700,000 1,879,031 1,939,719 1,965,351 1,849,137
2 Turkey 46,000 61,697 59,171 60,270 64,750 62,904 63,580 72,655
3 South Korea 80,930 75,911 68,630 55,780 56,244 52,764 53,384 54,708
4 Italy 70,849 50,872 48,810 57,493 50,889 52,356 53,280 39,980
5 Greece 13,160 14,000 20,900 21,500 31,557 36,000 35,230 28,980
6 Portugal 22,224 24,305 22,350 18,271 26,780 29,875 34,165 50,000 [30]
7 Japan 65,300 21,700 23,500 19,100 16,500 18,700 16,500 15,700
8 Spain 37,515 10,000 10,000 10,000 16,185 15,623 15,091 25,500 [30]
9 North Korea 5,200 10,201 9,628 11,000 12,540 12,540 12,823 12,872
10 France 53,751 8,672 9,464 7,160 8,642 8,406 8,683 7,350
11 Albania - 5,580 5,450 5,200 6,040 6,226 5,242 5,846
12 Chile - - - - 2,718 2,108 2,166 2,848
13 Bosnia and Herzegovina - - - - 1,142 1,154 1,179 2,109
14 Australia - - - - - 1,100 1,100 1,100 [31]
15 Azerbaijan - - - - 763 634 614 593
16 Bulgaria - - - - 502 503 515
17 North Macedonia - - - - 510 396 407 1,439
18 Ukraine - - - - 218 - 229 228
19 Slovenia - - - - 76 63 225 60
20 Switzerland - - - - 177 180 180 265
21 Hungary - - - - 218 227 148 200
22 Romania - - - - 33 31 37 40
23 Austria - - - - - - - 120 [32]
World 528,433 1,890,179 1,954,623 2,022,831 2,261,589 2,327,495 2,353,825 2,406,903
Source: UN Food & Agriculture Organization these data may include some "chestnuts" production yields unrelated to the species castanea [33]

It has been a staple food in southern Europe, Turkey, and southwestern and eastern Asia [8] [34] for millennia, largely replacing cereals where these would not grow well, if at all, in mountainous Mediterranean areas. [35] Evidence of its cultivation by man is found since around 2000 BC. [36] Alexander the Great and the Romans planted chestnut trees across Europe while on their various campaigns. A Greek army is said to have survived their retreat from Asia Minor in 401–399 BC thanks to their stores of chestnuts. [37] Ancient Greeks, such as Dioscorides and Galen, wrote of chestnuts to comment on their medicinal properties—and of the flatulence induced by eating too much of it. [14] To the early Christians, chestnuts symbolized chastity. [16] Until the introduction of the potato, whole forest-dwelling communities which had scarce access to wheat flour relied on chestnuts as their main source of carbohydrates. [8] In some parts of Italy, a cake made of chestnuts is used as a substitute for potatoes. [5] In 1583, Charles Estienne and Jean Liébault wrote, "an infinity of people live on nothing else but (the chestnut)". [38] In 1802, an Italian agronomist said of Tuscany that "the fruit of the chestnut tree is practically the sole subsistence of our highlanders", [39] while in 1879 it was said that it almost exclusively fed whole populations for half the year, as "a temporary but complete substitution for cereals". [40]

Boundary records compiled in the reign of John already showed the famous Tortworth Chestnut in South Gloucestershire, as a landmark it was also known by the same name of "Great Chestnut of Tortworth" in the days of Stephen. This tree measured over 50 feet (15 m) in circumference at 5 feet (1.5 m) from the ground in 1720. The Hundred Horse Chestnut in the chestnut forests on Mount Etna is the oldest living chestnut tree and is said to be even larger. Chestnut trees particularly flourish in the Mediterranean basin. [18] In 1584, the governor of Genoa, which dominated Corsica, ordered all the farmers and landowners to plant four trees yearly, among which was a chestnut tree – plus olive, fig and mulberry trees. Many communities owe their origin and former richness to the ensuing chestnut woods. [41] In France, the marron glacé, a candied chestnut involving 16 different processes in a typically French cooking style, is always served at Christmas and New Year's time. [16] In Modena, Italy, they are soaked in wine before roasting and serving, [16] and are also traditionally eaten on Saint Simon's Day in Tuscany. [37] In the Romagna region, roasted chestnuts are often served with a traditional wine, the Cagnina di Romagna. It is traditional to eat roasted chestnuts in Portugal on St. Martin's Day.

Their popularity declined during the last few centuries, partly due to their reputation of "food for poor people". [42] Many people did not want to take chestnut bread as "bread" because chestnut flour does not rise. Some slandered chestnut products in such words as the bread which "gives a sallow complexion" written in 1770, [43] or in 1841 "this kind of mortar which is called a soup". [44] The last decades' worldwide renewal may have profited from the huge reforestation efforts started in the 1930s in the United States to establish varieties of C. sativa which may be resistant to chestnut blight, as well as to relieve the strain on cereal supplies.

The main region in Italy for chestnut production is the Mugello region in 1996, the European Community granted the fruit Protected Geographic Indication (equivalent to the French Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée) status to the Mugello sweet chestnut. It is markedly sweet, peels easily, is not excessively floury or astringent, and has notes of vanilla, hazelnut, and, more subtly, fresh bread. There is no unpleasant aroma, such as yeast, fungus, mold or paper, which sometimes occur with other chestnuts. [45] The main regions in France for chestnut production are the départements of Ardèche, with the famous "Châtaigne d'Ardèche" (A.O.C), of the Var (Eastern Provence), of the Cévennes (Gard and Lozère départements) and of the Lyon region. France annually produces over 1,000 metric tons, but still imports about 8,000 metric tons, mainly from Italy. [46]

In Portugal's archipelago of Madeira, chestnut liquor is a traditional beverage, and it is gaining popularity with the tourists and in continental Portugal. [47]

Asia Edit

Always served as part of the New Year's menu in Japan, chestnuts represent both success and hard times—mastery and strength. [16] The Japanese chestnut (kuri) was in cultivation before rice [48] and the Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima) possibly for 2,000 to 6,000 years. [10]

During British colonial rule in the mid-1700s to 1947, the sweet chestnut (C. sativa) was widely introduced in the temperate parts of the Indian subcontinent, mainly in the lower- to middle Himalayas. They are widely found in British-founded hill stations in northern India, and to a lesser extent in Bhutan and Nepal. They are mainly used as an ornamental tree and are found in almost all British-founded botanical gardens and official governmental compounds (such as larger official residences) in temperate parts of the Indian subcontinent.

China has about 300 chestnut cultivars. Moreover, the 'Dandong' chestnut (belonging to the Japanese chestnut C. crenata) is a major cultivar in Liaoning Province. [49]

North America Edit

American Indians were eating the American chestnut species, mainly C. dentata and some others, long before European immigrants introduced their stock to America, and before the arrival of chestnut blight. [37] In some places, such as the Appalachian Mountains, one-quarter of hardwoods were chestnuts. Mature trees often grew straight and branch-free for 50 feet (15 m), up to 100 feet, averaging up to 5 ft in diameter. For three centuries, most barns and homes east of the Mississippi River were made from it. [50] In 1911, the food book The Grocer's Encyclopedia noted that a cannery in Holland included in its "vegetables-and-meat" ready-cooked combinations, a "chestnuts and sausages" casserole besides the more classic "beef and onions" and "green peas and veal". This celebrated the chestnut culture that would bring whole villages out in the woods for three weeks each autumn (and keep them busy all winter), and deplored the lack of food diversity in the United States's shop shelves. [5]

Soon after that, though, the American chestnuts were nearly wiped out by chestnut blight. The discovery of the blight fungus on some Asian chestnut trees planted on Long Island, New York, was made public in 1904. Within 40 years, the nearly four billion-strong American chestnut population in North America was devastated [51] only a few clumps of trees remained in Michigan, Wisconsin, California and the Pacific Northwest. [37] Due to disease, American chestnut wood almost disappeared from the market for decades, although quantities can still be obtained as reclaimed lumber. [52] Today, they only survive as single trees separated from any others (very rare), and as living stumps, or "stools", with only a few growing enough shoots to produce seeds shortly before dying. This is just enough to preserve the genetic material used to engineer an American chestnut tree with the minimal necessary genetic input from any of the disease-immune Asiatic species. Efforts started in the 1930s are still ongoing to repopulate the country with these trees, in Massachusetts [53] and many places elsewhere in the United States. [54] In the 1970s, geneticist Charles Burnham began back-breeding Asian chestnut into American chestnut populations to confer blight resistance with the minimum difference in genes. [55] In the 1950s, the Dunstan chestnut was developed in Greensboro, N.C., and constitutes the majority of blight-free chestnuts produced in the United States annually.

Today, the nut's demand outstrips supply. The United States imported 4,056 metric tons of European in-shell chestnuts worth $10 million in 2007. [56] The U.S. chestnut industry is in its infancy, producing less than 1% of total world production. Since the mid-20th century, most of the US imports are from Southern Italy, with the large, meaty, and richly flavored Sicilian chestnuts being considered among the best quality for bulk sale and supermarket retail. Some imports come from Portugal and France. The next two largest sources of imports are China and South Korea. [56] The French varieties of marrons are highly favored and sold at high prices in gourmet shops. [16]

A study of the sector in 2005 found that US producers are mainly part-timers diversifying an existing agricultural business, or hobbyists. [57] Another recent study indicates that investment in a new plantation takes 13 years to break even, at least within the current Australian market. [58] Starting a small-scale operation requires a relatively low initial investment this is a factor in the small size of the present production operations, with half of them being between 3 and 10 acres (12,000 and 40,000 m 2 ). Another determining factor in the small productivity of the sector is that most orchards have been created less than 10 years ago, so have young trees which are as now barely entering commercial production. [57] Assuming a 10 kg (22 lb) yield for a 10-year-old tree is a reliable conservative estimate, though some exceptional specimens of that age have yielded 100 kg (220 lb). [58] So, most producers earn less than $5,000 per year, with a third of them not having sold anything so far. [57]

Moreover, the plantings have so far been mostly of Chinese species, but the products are not readily available. [57] The American Chestnut Foundation currently recommends waiting a while more before large-scale planting, [ citation needed ] because the organization and its associates (the American Chestnut Cooperators' Foundation and many others from education, research and industry sectors contributing to the program) are in the last stages of developing a variety that is as close as possible to the American chestnut, while having incorporated the blight-resistant gene of the Asiatic species. Considering the additional advantage that chestnut trees can be easily grown organically, [57] and assuming the development of brands in the market and everything else being equal, home-grown products would reach higher prices than imports, [ citation needed ] the high volume of which indicates a market with expanding prospects. [57] As of 2008, the price for chestnuts sold fresh in the shell ranges from $1.50/lb ($3.30/kg) wholesale to about $5/lb ($11/kg) retail, depending mainly on the size. [56] [57]

Australia, New Zealand Edit

The Australian gold rush of the 1850s and 1860s led to the first recorded plantings of European chestnut trees, brought from Europe by settlers. [10] Along the years, most chestnut tree plantations were C. sativa stock, which is still the dominant species. Some of these remain today. Some trees in northern Victoria are around 120 years old and up to 60 m tall. Chestnuts grow well in southwest Western Australia, which has cold winters and warm to hot summers. [8] As of 2008, the country has nearly 350 growers, annually producing around 1,200 metric tons of chestnuts, of which 80% come from northeast Victoria. The produce is mostly sold to the domestic fresh fruit market. Chestnuts are slowly gaining popularity in Australia. A considerable increase in production is expected in the next 10 years, due to the increase in commercial plantings during the last 15 [4] to 25 years. [8] By far, the most common species in Australia is the European chestnut, but small numbers of the other species, as well as some hybrids have been planted. [4] The Japanese chestnut (C. crenata) does well in wet and humid weather and in hot summers (about 30 °C) and was introduced to New Zealand in the early 1900s, more so in the upper North Island region. [10]


Supreme Chef

This cook can whip up confections that make taste buds weep with joy, and make characters want to stuff themselves because the food is that good. Be warned, though, this character takes insults to their art very personally!

Often the Team Chef. If there are more than one, a Cooking Duel is inevitable.

Naturally the best friend of the Big Eater, if they're not the same person.

This chef may engage in Through His Stomach, but as a general expression of affection, or even a generalized benevolence, not a particular sign of deep passion. Your Favorite is similarly not a profound gesture when made by this chef unless it necessarily involves them specially going out of their way to do so. If this chef engages in Through His Stomach or Your Favorite and is a baker, that falls under Sweet Baker. They might provoke a Heel–Face Turn through the power of their cooking. Since both Real Men and Feminine Women Can Cook this character is just as likely to be male as female.


Top 20 Mid-Atlantic Food Trucks


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This mobile vegan restaurant is a projection of the bliss and delight from the depths of the owners’ hearts. Since Valentine’s Day 2010, The Cinnamon Snail food truck has been serving NYC and NJ maniacal vegan goodies!

2. Twisted Sisters Cupcakes & Sugar Shack Cafe, Virginia Beach


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Twisted Sisters is a great gourmet cupcake truck with a changing weekly menu. They have creative flavors like “Harry Potter Butter Beer” and pudding filled cakes as well.

3. The Grilled Cheeserie Nashville, TN


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Created by Los Angeles transplants Crystal De Luna-Bogan, a Le Cordon Bleu trained chef, and her husband Joseph, a musician and foodie. The Grilled Cheeserie – a gourmet grilled cheese food truck – Text CHEESE to 88000 to find their daily location!

4. Red Hook Lobster, DC


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Each day, Red Hook Lobster Pound, DC serves up lunch to hundreds of Washingtonians — providing a taste of Maine that everyone enjoys.

5. Strite’s Donuts Harrisonburg, VA


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Anyone who has tried one of Strite’s donuts fresh out of the oil will still remember that soft, warm morsel, dripping with goodness and flavor! And even the most self-disciplined person will be back for seconds.

6. Gelati Celesti Richmond, VA


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Remember when ice cream trucks had more than just Popsicles? Gelati Celesti has real homemade ice cream in flavors that go beyond the big three (chocolate, vanilla, strawberry). They also make their own cones.

7. Goatacado Richmond, VA


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For any health nuts out there, Goatacado is perfect. They focus on healthy and fresh food, and a strong commitment to the environment.

8. Bian Dang, NYC


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Where can one get Taiwanese-style fried chicken over rice, seasoned with a delicious home-cooked pork sauce, with tea eggs and handmade dumplings on the side? This Taiwanese-style food truck is probably the only truck out there.

9. The Bakers Dozen Donuts Harrisonburg, VA


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If fresh HOMEMADE, made from scratch donuts and baked goods are your thing, The Bakers Dozen Donuts has you covered!

10. Biscuit Love Truck Franklin, TN


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Founded in 2012 by Karl and Sarah Worley, The Biscuit Love Truck has an assortment of menu options that include Nashville’s own hot chicken and a sweet sandwich named after their daughter, Gertie, and what she loves most. Between the regular and seasonal offerings, there is sure to be something to please every palate. With a commitment to sourcing locally and giving back to the community, this truck is truly one with a heart. Find them in the city now and try some Biscuit Love!

11. The Smoking Swine Baltimore, MD


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The Smoking Swine makes traditional, no-nonsense BBQ. The have great pulled pork and sausage.

12. Grilled Cheese Mania Harrisonburg, VA


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These homemade sandwiches are simply delicious! They always use fresh vegetables, cheeses, meats and breads to make the perfect grilled cheese for you. All of their soups, sides, sauces and drinks are made using their own family recipes.

13. The Big Cheese, DC


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The Big Cheese is a gourmet grilled cheese food truck in the DC area providing affordable gourmet grilled cheeses for parents and children alike.

14. Cap Mac, DC


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CapMac was opened in November of 2010, and the truck has skyrocketed to local fame and earned numerous accolades on a national level.

15. WOLO – Mobile Food Truck/Catering Bel Air, MD


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WOLO makes everything from traditional American, Cajun, Greek to Cuban, Mexican and Vietnamese.

16. Bruno’s GastroTruck Charlottesville, VA


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The GastroTruck is a fully loaded kitchen on wheels. Bruno is able to give you that same restaurant quality food, only faster and on the streets. The menu will change at least weekly if not daily based on what crazy things he comes up with next.

17. Ta Korean, DC


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Delicious Korean BBQ Tacos for Washington, DC on the go!

18. Carpe Donut Charlottesville, VA


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Once upon a time, two donut-loving fools decided that the people of Charlottesville, Va. needed a source for hot fresh donuts made from scratch with fresh organic ingredients. Carpe Donut was born.

19. DC Slices, DC


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DC’s first mobile pizza kitchen! Baking up fun and Thin Crust pizza on the go.

20. Bro’s Fish Tacos Virginia Beach


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This husband and wife team serves California style beer battered fish tacos and grilled chipotle lime seasoned cod! Not only that, all there produce is organic, and their fish is wild caught.

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Watch the video: The Sweet u0026 Savory Everything Doughnut How Good Can It Get w. Shane Torres (August 2022).